Apartment Therapy Complete and Happy Home (2015)

PART TWO

living in your home

 entryways

 living spaces

 eating spaces

 kitchens

 work spaces

 bedrooms

 kids’ spaces

 bathrooms

 outdoor spaces

entryways

EAST COAST

Deborah Nevins

Landscape Designer

the southwest-gone-bright entry

AUSTIN

Sara Oswalt

Fashion/Interior Stylist

One of the bonuses of living in an older home in Austin (such as this one from 1905) is that a dedicated entry hall is quite often part of the deal. Not always so generously sized in modern houses, this kind of space provides a golden opportunity to set the style story of your home and make organization a priority from the moment you cross the threshold.

This bright, spacious entry does a great job of disguising its smart function in fun, pop-y, Southwest decor. Striped wall hooks, in a trio of different sizes, serve as a semipermanent home for daily-use items, like winter scarves or a favorite bag. The extra-long, rustic bench, a flea market find, is a more temporary drop zone and place for things you don’t want to forget in your morning rush. An easy-to-clean cotton rug protects the wood floors in such a high-traffic zone, while also waking up the whole space with its traditional Southwestern pattern and modern-bright color scheme.

HOOK. LINE. SINKER. A series of wall-mounted hooks are a good-looking way to customize storage in an entry. Just obey the cardinal rule: one item per hook, or your wall could start to resemble a messy closet.

HOOK. LINE. SINKER. A series of wall-mounted hooks are a good-looking way to customize storage in an entry. Just obey the cardinal rule: one item per hook, or your wall could start to resemble a messy closet.

POP ART. A grid of black-and-white posters are hung in bright, cherry-red frames. The unexpected color choice turns what could have been a plain-Jane display into something far more special.

POP ART. A grid of black-and-white posters are hung in bright, cherry-red frames. The unexpected color choice turns what could have been a plain-Jane display into something far more special.

the “quick” entry

BROOKLYN

Moon Rhee + Heyja Do

Shop Owners, Dear: Rivington+

This glowing entryway greets you when you arrive on the thirtieth floor of a Brooklyn high-rise. Part streamlined function and part personal whimsy, it takes care of business and lifts your spirits as soon as you open the door.

If your home is a footwear-free zone—like this one—a bench makes kicking off and slipping on shoes simple, an ease that’s extra-important when you have a large dog that loves walks. And since this space is more of a long hallway than a spacious mudroom, wall-hung storage plays a huge role in keeping the chaotic comings and goings flowing smoothly.

Even the practical components of this entryway set the right, welcoming tone. The artwork and photographs propped on the bench are a nice way to signal a return to a private, personal space. The red pom “flower” is purposely placed to the right of the entryway, farther down the hall. The flash of color not only catches your attention, but red, according to feng shui, draws good energy and luck through your doorway.

A COLLECTOR’s EYE. The beautiful red pom “flowers” are actually mini antique dusters the homeowners upturned at a local vintage store—proof that beauty can be found in the most common objects.

A COLLECTOR’S EYE. The beautiful red pom “flowers” are actually mini antique dusters the homeowners upturned at a local vintage store—proof that beauty can be found in the most common objects.

PERSONAL GREETING. This couple takes turns rotating in photographs and mementos, such as the dried roses, for a sweet “welcome home” surprise.

PERSONAL GREETING. This couple takes turns rotating in photographs and mementos, such as the dried roses, for a sweet “welcome home” surprise.

the indoor/outdoor mudroom

LOS ANGELES

Anne Ziegler + Scott Mason

Trend Forecaster + Entertainment Executive

Nestled in the steep hills of Laurel Canyon, this 1930s home greets its guests with a tangle of greenery that follows them up the stairs and flourishes at the front door. There, they’ll find an entryway in two parts: the bit that’s inside and the bit that’s out.

Not every home has space inside its doorway for a bench. Here, the homeowners rather smartly expanded their usable space by placing an industrial metal bench outside the glass front door, which is usually left open. This means all the “shoe business” (taking them off, putting them on) doesn’t need to happen within the tight quarters of the actual entryway.

Inside the small mudroom, the pine floors are lightly whitewashed, and everything else is painted a flat white. This combination brightens the space while providing a great backdrop for a unique collection of plants and art. The cerulean blue chair, coat closet, and rustic table are there for function—dropping off keys, hanging up jackets. But the most stunning piece of all is the immense ceramic bowl; its surprising contrast to the small objects around it catches your eye from almost every other room of the house.

BEVY OF BEAUTIES. As with art and collections, plants look great in multiples. Scattered at the front door in mismatched pots, this makeshift “garden” is far more interesting than a single planter.

BEVY OF BEAUTIES. As with art and collections, plants look great in multiples. Scattered at the front door in mismatched pots, this makeshift “garden” is far more interesting than a single planter.

SURPRISING SCALE. This huge ceramic bowl sits under a tiny John Derian print. The play between big and small is a fun variation on the norm.

SURPRISING SCALE. This huge ceramic bowl sits under a tiny John Derian print. The play between big and small is a fun variation on the norm.

FEET FIRST. No front door is complete without a good door mat. Sure it will keep shoes clean, but, really, it is an opportunity to add more color and texture to your entry.

FEET FIRST. No front door is complete without a good door mat. Sure it will keep shoes clean, but, really, it is an opportunity to add more color and texture to your entry.

the never-too-thin entry

NEW YORK CITY

Maxwell Ryan

Apartment Therapy Founder

daughter, Ursula

Even when space is tight, there’s always an opportunity to carve out an entryway moment that makes your life easier. The narrow hallway of this newly renovated apartment in SoHo is proof of that. It takes full advantage of wall space as you move from the front door to the dining room, sprinkling strategic storage moments along the way.

Every piece was thoughtfully selected to serve a purpose. The half-moon entry table has no sharp edges—a danger in tight quarters on chaotic mornings—and serves as a landing strip where bowls of change and watches are lined up and waiting. For last-minute tie checks, a mirror was placed just inside the door. And in the distance, an Eames hanging rack catches all the winter coats and hats.

But this hardworking space isn’t all function. Entryways also make excellent gallery walls for art. The cluster of photos and cutting boards here fill the space and make the hallway feel more crowded, but this is intentional. Beyond this narrow passage, the walls open into white expanses. The contrast between tight-and-cozy and bright-and-airy packs a visual—and very memorable—punch.

LINE ’EM UP. Watches and eyeglasses are stored on the entryway table so they’re not forgotten on the way out the door, while change bowls are set up as an organized way to empty pockets at the end of the day.

LINE ’EM UP. Watches and eyeglasses are stored on the entryway table so they’re not forgotten on the way out the door, while change bowls are set up as an organized way to empty pockets at the end of the day.

ENDLESS RUN. The slimmest member of the rug family, a runner is a great (typically affordable) way to inject a hallway with style. If you have the length, play around with layering different colors or patterns.

ENDLESS RUN. The slimmest member of the rug family, a runner is a great (typically affordable) way to inject a hallway with style. If you have the length, play around with layering different colors or patterns.

the compact cottage mudroom

AUSTIN

Tim Cuppett + Marco Rini

Architect + Garden Designer

This clean and charming, small-space entry is like a breath of fresh air inside the home, the perfect spot to kick off your garden shoes after visiting the chicken coop in the yard, or to hang up your hat after a nice long walk with the dog.

This hardworking nook keeps things unfussy and practical. It mainly consists of hooks for keys, leashes, hats, and bike helmets and a compact bench, built for one—just the right size for pulling on rain boots (which, you’ll notice, fit perfectly underneath) or stashing a bag of dry cleaning that’s ready for drop-off. To help with flow through the tiny space—four doorways dead-end here—half doors were swapped in for full-size ones where possible.

Remember that not all entryways need to be supersized to be superhelpful. In this case, keeping the storage options minimal makes being organized easy. This space simply can’t get overcrowded with stuff that doesn’t belong, because there’s only room for the things that do.

VINTAGE ACCENTS. Labeling hooks in an entryway is helpful, but when done as thoughtfully as this, it can also become a decor boost. These were made using metal holders and printed labels that have all the charm of an old schoolhouse.

VINTAGE ACCENTS. Labeling hooks in an entryway is helpful, but when done as thoughtfully as this, it can also become a decor boost. These were made using metal holders and printed labels that have all the charm of an old schoolhouse.

GOOD GLOSS. Tough, higher gloss paint finishes are used throughout this home, which gives it a subtle but distinct European look. A bonus is how well this paint stands up to everyday wear and tear.

GOOD GLOSS. Tough, higher gloss paint finishes are used throughout this home, which gives it a subtle but distinct European look. A bonus is how well this paint stands up to everyday wear and tear.