Faster than Lightning: My Autobiography - Usain Bolt (2013)

Picture Section

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A moment of calm. Chilling with my sister Christine in our Waldensia uniform. Somehow Mom namaged to stop me from moving for five seconds!

(Author)

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The house where I grew up in Coxheath. Great family memories.

(Mark Guthrie)

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The moment I announced myself as the Lightning Bolt to the world. When I won the 200 metres in the World Junior Championships in Kingston at the age of 15, I became a track and field phenomenon.

(Getty Images)

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In 2004, I broke the junior world record in the 200 metres at the CARIFTA Games with a time of 19.93 seconds. It was the fastest time of the season until the Athens Olympics later that year.

(Author)

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Winning the IAAF Rising Star Award in 2002. By then, my mom had so many trophies in the house she didn’t know what to do with them.

(Getty Images)

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With Coach Glen Mills – the guru. The man I describe as a second father. He is the one responsible for making me a legend on the track.

(Getty Images)

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How I remember the days when I used to run a lot of 400s at the National stadium in Kingston. They call me a quarter-miler running the sprint.

(Author)

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Where the hard work gets done. Training at the ‘Usain Bolt/UWI track’ at the University of the West Indies in Kingston.

(Author)

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This is what pure joy feels like. Winning my first 100 metres gold in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

(MCT via Getty Images)

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After taking gold in the 100 metres in Beijing, I lost my mind. I wanted to tear off my shirt I was so excited. Winning an Olympic gold was a dream.

(MCT via Getty Images)

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To Di World – it started in Beijing and became my signature pose. Everywhere I go in the world people want me to do it.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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The 4x100 metres world-record breaking Jamaican team (from left to right): Asafa Powell, Michael Frater, Nesta Carter and me. Breaking world records was icing, but winning gold was the cake.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Hanging out with NJ and Ricky. Laughter is never far away, even while we are working.

(Author)

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I was a good cricketer growing up. If I hadn’t specialised in track and field I would have probably played cricket.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Before and after every training session and race my masseur, Eddie, works on me to ensure my body stays injury free.

(Author)

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Swagging it in Paris – clean and fresh.

(Author)

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I was voted Laureus World Sportsman of the Year three times – honoured.

(Author)

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In my Kingston home with the Bolt family (from left to right): Pops (Wellesley); my sister, Christine; my brother, Sadiki; Mom (Jennifer). My family helped make me the man I am today.

(Mark Guthrie)

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Hanging on the streets of Kingston. I loved the freedom of the big city when I moved there in 2003.

(Mark Guthrie)

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Aunt Lily and the famous Trelawny yam. A lot of people think the starchy vegetable is one of the resons for Jamaica’s track and field success in recent years.

(Mark Guthrie)

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The lowest moment in my professional career: false-starting in the 100 metres final during the 2011 World Championships in Daegu was a shock to me. I heard a voice in my head whisper, ‘Go!’ and I moved too fast …

(AFP/Getty Images)

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… The worst thing is that I should have won the race easily. This photo shows the shock and pain of something I thought would never happen to me.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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I made up for my disappointment in the 100 by winning the 200 metres final in Daegu a few days later. You can’t keep a good man down!

(Sports Illustrated/Getty Images)

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Waving the Jamaican flag in London during the 2012 Olympic Games opening ceremony. London was hyped, the city was crazy with excitement. I couldn’t wait to prove to the world that I was a living legend.

(Sports Illustrated/Getty Images)

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Winning the Olympic 100 metres gold medal in London answered all my critics and solidified my status as a living legend.

(Popperfoto/Getty Images)

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Another Olympic gold medal, another Lightning Bolt for the world.

(MCT via Getty Images)

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I always feed off a crowd’s energy whenever I race. It pumps me up. When I’m charged and excited, nobody can beat me.

(Sports Illustrated/Getty Images)

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Representing Jamaica is important to me, but one of my track and field mottos is: ‘Do this thing for yourself first, the country second.’

(Getty Images)

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A historic 1-2-3 for Jamaica and Racers Track Club in the 200 metres final in London 2012. Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Warren Weir.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Burning home to win the 4x100 metres final in London 2012. With another three Olympic golds to my name, I was officially a living legend.

(Sports Illustrated/Getty Images)

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Sharing the podium with my team-mate and training partner, Yohan Blake.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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The Jamaican fans love track and field. Every gold medal causes a celebration on the streets of Jamaica.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Showing some love to Brazil. In 2013, I raced on the Copacabana beach in a 150 metres event. I’m hoping to go to the 2016 Olympics in Rio and make it another hat-trick of golds.

(LatinContent/Getty Images)

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Winning the 100 metres in the London Anniversary Games in 2013. I was building up to the big one: the World Championships in Moscow.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Winning in the rain: I raced a season’s best of 9.77 seconds to win the 2013 World Championships in Moscow. The lightning crackling overhead was a good omen.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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My own personal brand of Lightning Bolt to celebrate victory.

(AFP/Getty Images)